Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on 3D Printing Technology and Innovations Frankfurt, Germany.

Submit your Abstract
or e-mail to

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

Day 1 :

  • 3D Printing in Medicine | Advances in 3D Printing Technology and Additive Manufacturing | Benefits of 3D Printing and Technology| Innovations in 3D Printing| 3D Printing Technology Impact on Manufacturing Industry| 3D printing in Biomaterials| 3D Printing Materials| Polymers in 3d printing| Tissue and Organ printing| 3D Image Processing and Visualization| Metal 3D Printing| 3D Printing industries|3D Bio printing| Design for 3D Printing| 3D Printing Future Technology| 3D Printing for Liver Tissue Engineering| 3D Printing Technology & Market| Clinical applications of 3D Printing in Orthopaedics and Traumatology| Lasers in 3D printing in Manufacturing industry| Challenges in 3D Printing| Challenge of 3D Printing in Radiation oncology
Location: H4 Hotel Frankfurt Messe Oeserstraße 180, 65933 Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Session Introduction

Clive Roberts

School of Pharmacy, The University of Nottingham, United Kingdom

Title: 3D printing as a practical pharmaceutical manufacturing method?
Speaker
Biography:

Clive graduated in Physics from Imperial College, in 1987, receiving a PhD in surface physics, also from Imperial College in 1991. He is currently Head of the School of Pharmacy at Nottingham and in the past has been the founder and Director of the Nottingham Nanotechnology Centre (2007-2013). His research is focussed on improving methods to develop new medicines and has led to over 300 research publications.
Clive has over 25 years of experience in formulation methods supported by advanced nanoscale characterisation (h-index 46). He has aided the development of a number of delivery platforms and medicines with many industrial partners. Clive has in recent years been working on the 2D and 3D printing of solid dosage formulations. Clive was a co-founder of Molecular Profiles Ltd (now Juniper Pharmaceuticals) and was founder of Eminate Ltd, an IP translation company of the University of Nottingham that has globally licenced novel low-salt formulations products to Tate & Lyle (SodaLo®). He has led major public engagement activities including the NanoWhat East Midlands Roadshow that engaged with over 30000 members of the public and been involved in public exhibitions related to 3D printing of Medicines (Science Museum London, 2013-14, Manchester Science Museum 2014-2015).

Abstract:

The processes used to produce tablets, the dominant form of medicine taken by patients, have changed relatively little for over a century. While these approaches serve the industry and patients very well, they remain limited and cannot create complex dosage forms or bespoke medications tailored for an individual or sub-population (i.e., personalized medicines). This would be valuable in meeting therapeutic challenges and the need for personalized medicines. 3D printing, offers a route to address these issues. As an example, I will show among other examples, a 3DP 5-drug polypill and tablet with novel 3D architecture designed to control drug release. The potential and challenges for using 3DP in the manufacture of medicines will be discussed as well as the considerable challenges that must be met to satisfy scale-up issues and regulatory requirements. I aim to show that 3D printing has already shown the capacity to meet some regulatory requirements and while many challenges remain, this is a technology that could potentially benefit patients and radically alter the way; we make and distribute some medicines.

Speaker
Biography:

Narutoshi Hibino completed his Medical degrees at Ehime University, Japan. He completed Cardiac and Cardiovascular Surgery fellowships and obtained board certifications at Tokyo Women’s Medical University. Following a research fellowship for Tissue Engineering at Yale University, he completed Pediatric Cardiac Surgery fellowships at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington and Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio before joining the faculty at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Abstract:

Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide despite the variety of medical, mechanical, and surgical strategies. We have developed novel 3D printing technologies that could change the practice of cardiovascular disease treatment, including patient specific 3D printed tissue engineered vascular graft and bio 3D printed cardiac tissue. Author will discuss insights of these new 3D printing technology as well as challenges we need to overcome for future clinical application and commercialization.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohsen Seifi joined ASTM International in 2016 as a first Director of Additive Manufacturing Programs, in which he facilitates’ standardization activities across all ASTM technical committees and building new partnerships as well as development of new AM related products and services within diverse ASTM portfolios. He has also an appointment as a Staff Scientist/Researcher in Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center (AMMRC) at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). He received both his Master’s degree and Doctoral degree at CWRU in Materials Science and Engineering with emphasis on “Metal additive manufacturing qualification and standardization”. He has conducted extensive work on qualification of advanced materials including titanium and super alloys made by additive manufacturing (AM) techniques for use in critical applications. He has co-authored more than 20 publications and has presented more than 60 papers at various technical meetings.

Abstract:

As the metal additive manufacturing (AM) industry moves towards industrial production, the need for qualification standards covering all aspects of the technology becomes ever more prevalent. While some standards and specifications for documenting the various aspects of AM processes and materials exist and continue to evolve, many such standards still need to be matured or under consideration/development within standards development organizations (SDOs). A recent joint ASTM and ISO Partner Standards Developing Organization (PSDO) agreement has provided a unique opportunity to create globally recognized standards for additive manufacturing (AM); the purpose of the agreement is to eliminate duplication of effort while maximizing resource allocation within the additive manufacturing industry. A resource to aid in the identification and development and approval of new standards is a new framework that has introduced a comprehensive structure to target various aspects of the AM space, including feedstock materials, process/equipment, and finished parts properties. This approach will also enable the development of application-specific standards to address the needs of the aerospace, medical device, and automotive industries. In addition, recent efforts to create a gap analysis roadmap through America Makes & ANSI Additive Manufacturing Standardization Collaborative (AMSC) can provide a platform to coordinate and accelerate the development of industry-wide additive manufacturing standards consistent with stakeholder needs, thereby facilitating the growth of the AM industry. This roadmap is designed to identify standards (both approved and in process), assess gaps, and make recommendations for priority areas where there is a perceived need for additional R&D and standardization. Various ASTM technical committees are considering the development of standards for AM; in particular, Committee F42 on additive manufacturing technologies is the focal point for most of the ongoing activities within ASTM. While Committee F42 continues to develop standards (jointly with ISO as well as ASTM-specific), there are opportunities in areas occupied by additional ASTM technical committees where collaboration & leveraged expertise could contribute to the overall standards portfolio described by the structure described above. This brief presentation will provide insight based on the recent ASTM/ISO agreement as well as AMSC roadmap; potential opportunities and technical considerations in support of future standards development. A pathway for qualification/certification of AM parts enabled by the appropriate standardization landscape, will also be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Randy E Ellis is a Professor at Queen's University at Kingston. His primary Queen's appointment is at School of Computing, and he is also appointed as a Professor in Departments of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Surgery, and Biomedical and Molecular Sciences. He is the Project Leader of a large multidisciplinary group that investigates advanced health-care delivery. He is Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He has published more than 300 refereed scientific contributions and served extensively on editorial boards and program committees of major international conferences.

Abstract:

This work is a retrospective analysis of our 13 years of experience and a prediction of future prospects. A patient-specific instrument (PSI) is typically implemented as a rigid structure with two physically linked elements: a negative or mirror surface that physically mates with an anatomical region; and a means of guiding a surgical instrument, typically a surgical drill. Historically, early PSI’s were created from CT scans and manufactured by computer-numerical machining. It is now more common to use additive manufacturing to create a PSI. Although early PSI’s provided an improvement technical accuracy, more recent clinical trials are bringing into question the clinical benefit for high volume procedures. We believe that the seeming discrepancy between high technical accuracy and subsequent patient outcomes is attributable to two effects: selection of the procedure and patient for PSI application, and the inability to intraoperatively choose a surgical alternative. Since 2005, we have performed hundreds PSI-guided cases. These have included: hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty; post-traumatic total knee arthroplasty; knee osteochondral transplantation in younger patients; radius osteotomy about the wrist; pelvic reconstruction following oncological surgery; peri-orbital tumor access; and many one-of-a-kind, technically difficult, orthopedic procedures. We have found significant longer-term improvements for hip resurfacing, which is consistent with our 20+-year successes in image-guided orthopedic surgery. These surgical procedures share the properties of being technically difficult and in having nearby bone surfaces that are naturally free of osteophytes and periosteum, both of which can physically interfere with the mating process of PSI application. We have found PSI’s to effectively solve relatively straightforward navigation problems. The technique relies critically on a high quality CT 3D image that can be easily and accurately segmented. Osteophytes, in particular, have been obstacles in registration regions. Commercially available PSI’s may not adequately address this fundamental problem. When physical registration is problematic, the PSI technique must be converted to surgical navigation or to an older, non-navigated technology. We propose to bridge this technology gap by linking the physical registration of a PSI with electromagnetic navigation. In laboratory studies and a pilot cadaveric trial, this hybrid of a PSI with navigation has proven to be as accurate as navigation alone and considerably easier to perform. This technical advance places additive manufacturing of a PSI in a spectrum of technical solutions, potentially broadening the reach and effectiveness of them as implementations of image-guided surgery.

Speaker
Biography:

Shweta Thapa completed her MEng in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Rutgers University. Her special interest in 3D printing grew during her project work in college as well as interning for 3D printing companies. She is the Founder of 3Ducators - a non-profit organization for empowering communities using 3D printing. She has also worked in great mechanical industries like Atlas Copco and Trumpf Photonics. She is an esteemed member of National Association of Professional Women (NAPW).

Abstract:

3D printing has revolutionized the world of manufacturing, education, food, jewelry and will no doubt be our next in house robot, making luxury a convenience for us. My deep rooted interests for 3D printing in biomedical sciences and its upgrades in the medical field inspired me to design an economic DLP cum resin 3D printer for fine resolution and precise micro fabrication. This printer finds great application in the medical industry and jewelry business.The system is based on projection of micro stereo-lithography which involves additive layer by layer manufacturing of the 3D polymer on application of LED light from the projector. Existing DLP and resin printers cost manifolds and are not accessible to the common man. A printer that can solve problems of the mankind and is affordable at the same time is the subject matter of this technology. A compact and portable 3D printing system composed of a simple desktop and a 700 lumen light projector can be used to make microstructures and soft materials of the order of 50-300 microns. The study involves the development of the experimental setup, optical and material characterization of the system and product specimen testing on the shape memory polymer.

Speaker
Biography:

Michael Peter Down is a Post-Doctoral Research Asociate at Manchester Metropolitan University, specializing in “Nanocomposites and nanomaterials for electronics and energy storage applications”. He completed his PhD at University of Southampton in collaboration with Siemens AG, developing and investigating advanced nanocomposites for applications in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) relays and switches, and before this, he studied Physics at the University of York.

Abstract:

The upsurge and augmentation of additive manufacturing and 3D printing have developed a new approach to manufacturing and the application of advanced materials. As such, large range of materials has become available for advanced applications, from printing biomedical devices to electronics. Despite the wide range of the materials available, the representative value of the recycled material in the field is only minimal. Further to this, the failed print and calibration wastage significantly contributes to the collective waste plastics. Many investigations have demonstrated that recycled materials can be used for additive manufacturing, mostly homo-monomer polymers, such as plastic cups and bottles. The truth, however, is that this is merely a drop in an already overwhelming ocean of waste plastics. Manchester Metropolitan University has been researching the application of advanced polymer composites from commercial and industrial waste plastics for additive manufacturing. The work presented here demonstrates the feasibility of the waste plastic to be utilized in additive manufacturing and prototyping.

Richard L. Wilson

Towson University Philosophy/Computer Science, USA

Title: 3D Printing: An Anticipatory Ethical Analysis of Future Developments
Speaker
Biography:

Professor Wilson is a specialist in Applied and Practical Ethics as well as Anticipatory Ethics. Most recently he has focused on developing courses in Philosophy of Technology including Engineering Ethics and Computer Science Ethics. In addition he has taught Ethics courses in a wide variety of fields in Medical Ethics, Business Ethics, Media Ethics and Environmental Ethics. He has published 6 books, a number of book chapters, and papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

3D printing (or “additive manufacturing”) has already begun to change the nature of how businesses produce artefacts. From the perspective of business, 3D printing replaces earlier methods of manufacturing so that rather than cutting material away in order to make products, it produces artefacts by adding material in layers. This method of manufacturing creates alterations at a number of levels when compared with traditional manufacturing. It greatly reduces the amount of waste created by traditional manufacturing. It allows precise control over the material composition of products. It exerts an influence upon the design of products that allows for rapid designing, rapid prototyping, and rapid re-designing. It allows for the production of items where no assembly is required while also allowing compact, portable manufacturing. While 3D printing has the potential for altering the nature of business practices, it has already begun to shift the traditional models of production for both businesses and individuals. There are alterations related to the product design process and as well as economies of scale. 3D printing allows the development of a business model that combines aspects of mass production and artisan individual production. Anticipatory ethics provides a basis for addressing a variety of important questions about 3D printing and the alterations in business it stands to create. In addition to describing how 3D printing will create alterations in business, this analysis will also attempt to show how 3D printing will help to develop a sustainable future, allow for resource efficiency, increase recycling, increase local digital manufacturing, produce new methods for repair, and influence developments in synthetic biology and nanotechnology. This discussion will provide a foundation for attempting to anticipate ethical issues that may arise for businesses and society at large as a result of future developments in 3D printing.

Biography:

Frank-Ulrich Gast completed his PhD in Biochemistry at University of Hannover, Germany, and performed Post-doctoral studies at University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, at Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried, and at Justus Liebig University, Gießen. Since 2002, he is in the marketing & sales team of GeSiM, a major provider of microfluidic instrumentation and lab automation. Instruments include non-contact micro arrayers, 3D printers, micro contact printers, and robots for chemical synthesis. He has more than 20 entries in PubMed, mainly on protein-nucleic acid interactions, and published more papers in other journals.

Abstract:

Manufacturing three-dimensional bioscaffolds is revolutionizing cell biology, as only 3D cell cultures are physiological and eventually lead to printed organs for transplantation. GeSiM has therefore developed a 3D biomaterial printer, which is not just another “me-too” instrument, as revealed by its unprecedented flexibility. The BioScaffolder is based on a proven belt-driven robotic platform with up to seven Z-drives, controlled by a programmable logic controller box also providing pressure regulation and liquid handling, and one software for all configurations. Mounting other tools converts the BioScaffolder to numerous other lab robots, i.e. for micro arraying, standard liquid handling, parallel chemical micro-synthesis, bioscaffold printing, micro contact printing (µ CP), nanoimprint lithography (NIL), and more. The standard BioScaffolder combines gas-pressure-controlled extrusion of three pastes (cooled or heated) with non-contact spotting of small drops of signal proteins, cell suspensions etc. Fine adjustment works by measuring tip positions and substrate heights. Further head functionalities are: camera for target finding and quality control, UV cross-linking, printing of vascular (core/shell) structures, high-temperature filament extrusion, displacement liquid dispensing with disposable tips, dual piezo pipetting with in-flight droplet mixing, glue and powder micro dispensing, solvent dispensing and evaporation, cap opening, vacuum gripping, µCP/NIL stamping, spin coating, and pH titration. Tools on the base plate can be high-temperature reactors and holders for tips/needles, microliter plates (cooled/heated), slides, Eppendorf tubes or reaction vessels; completed by ancillary tools like tip cleaning and measuring station, washing/drying stations and stroboscope for piezo pipettes. Tools can be mixed and matched. We will present the numerous options and practical examples.

Speaker
Biography:

Charisios Achillas completed his PhD at Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Greece. He is the Scientific Associate at International Hellenic University and a Senior Researcher at Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering of Aristotle University's Mechanical Engineering department. He is the author of more than 120 scientific publications, including more than 35 papers in peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Recently, a number of commercially available 3D printing technologies are competing with traditional manufacturing techniques in the fabrication of products. In this work, different additive manufacturing technologies are compared with injection molding in terms of fabricating a plastic housing for a real-world company. The different technologies are assessed in terms of lead time and total production cost. For low-volume production, both rapid tooling and additive manufacturing may offer a competitive alternative that could result into shorter lead times and decreased total production costs. Additionally, introducing additive manufacturing in a producer’s production portfolio may increase flexibility, reduce warehousing costs, and assist the company towards the adoption of a mass customization business strategy.

Speaker
Biography:

Kentaro Takiame completed his PhD and became an Assistant Professor at Kyoto University. He is the Director of Advanced Reactive System lab, Kanazawa University, Japan. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Three-dimensional (3D) ultraviolet (UV) inkjet printers represent a versatile technology for creating complex functional structures. During their operation, 3D objects are formed by repeating cycles of drawing a UV-curable resin with inkjet nozzles and then solidifying it with UV irradiation. In this study, the activity performed by a 3D UV inkjet printer was simulated by spin casting a 33 μm thick layer of UV-curable resin (containing diurethane dimethacrylate and 1-hydroxycyclohexyl phenyl ketone compounds mixed at a weight ratio of 99:1) onto a Si wafer followed by photo polymerization for 2 s at a UV irradiation of 10 mW cm-2. Afterwards, the second resin layer with a thickness of 33 μm was spun-cast onto the first layer and photo-polymerized under the same conditions. The conversion distribution of C=C bonds in the UV-curable resin was investigated via confocal laser Raman microscopy and numerical calculations, which took into account the kinetics of photo-polymerization and oxygen inhibition reactions. The obtained experimental data were in good agreement with the results of numerical calculations, which attributed the existence of the two plateaus on the plot of the C=C bond conversion distribution to the formation of an oxygen lean point. In addition, the effects of the UV intensity, irradiation time, lamination time, photo-initiator concentration, and concentration of dissolved oxygen on the oxygen concentration and conversion distributions across the depth direction have been examined. The obtained results revealed that the increases in the UV intensity, irradiation time, and photo-initiator concentration as well as the decrease in the initial dissolved oxygen concentration effectively increased the conversion of C=C bonds in the resin film and decreased the thickness of an un-polymerized layer.

Speaker
Biography:

Wei Min Huang completed his PhD at Cambridge University, UK. After that, he joined the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He has over 20 years of experience on Shape Memory Materials and Technology and has published research articles extensively in this field, including two books about shape memory alloys and shape memory polymers, respectively. His research interest in 3D printing is actually focused on 4D features, in particular to achieve re-programmable sequential folding/unfolding of 3D printed structures via the shape memory effect.

Abstract:

Sequentially controlled folding/unfolding (or shape morphing) has been a hot research topic for a number of years. Given the additional feature of shape switching, 3D printing can be naturally extended to 4D printing, so that the application area of 3D printed structures can be significantly widened. In technical terms, there are four basic approaches to achieve 4D printing, but so far to realize sequentially pre-determined morphing in 3D printed sophisticated structures is still a challenge. In this paper, by means of integration of two separately well explored concepts, namely, multiple stable structure and compliant mechanism, we demonstrate how to achieve sequentially controlled morphing in 3D printed structures. More importantly, we show that, the morphing sequence of the 3D printed structures not only can be determined in the early design stage before the structures have been 3D printed, but also can be re-programmed in the later on stage after the structures have actually been printed utilizing the shape memory effect to fix the structures into a new shape. Since the heat/chemo-responsive shape memory effect has been proved to be an intrinsic feature of most polymeric materials, re-programmable sequential folding/unfolding can be easily realized in 3D printed polymeric structures by design.

Speaker
Biography:

Grissel Rodríguez-Roldán completed her BS degree in Bionics Engineering at Interdisciplinary Professional Unit on Engineering and Advanced Technologies (UPIITA), Mexico, Mexico City, in 2013 and MSc in Electrical Engineering at Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute (CINVESTAV-IPN) Mexico, in 2015. She is currently pursuing her PhD at the same center (CINVESTAV-IPN). Her research interest includes Smart Materials, Biomaterials, Polymers and 3D Printing.

Abstract:

Smart materials have one or more properties that can be changed in response to an external stimulus, such as magnetic or electric fields, pressure, stress, temperature or humidity. Among smart materials, piezoelectric ones are most widely used in so many applications. In this study, a smart polymer, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was used to fabricate pressure, humidity and temperature sensors via 3D printing. Pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties were investigated using an astable multivibrator circuit as changes in PVDF permittivity were observed according to these stimuli. Experimental results show an almost linear and inversely proportional behavior between these stimuli with the frequency response. Smart sensors are a promising tool in biomedical field, allowing patients to monitor themselves.

Keun Park

Seoul National University of Science and Technology, South Korea

Title: Design and fabrication of a porous cast using additive manufacturing
Speaker
Biography:

Keun Park has completed his PhD at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea, and Post-doctoral studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA. He worked as a Senior Researcher at Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co., Korea. He is a Professor of Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Korea. His research fields are “Materials processing and additive manufacturing, including design for manufacturing (DFM) and design for additive manufacturing (DFAM)”. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editor of International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing.

Abstract:

These days, additive manufacturing (AM) has been changed from the conventional rapid prototyping (RP) to direct fabrication of functional parts. As a direct fabrication method, a promising application of AM is to make customized parts for biomedical applications. In this study, a customized cast with a porous shell structure is developed to replace traditional plaster casts. Although recent developments of customized casts are based on three-dimensional (3D) scan data of a human body and are designed to fit the body, such as personalized design might not be applicable to real orthopedic treatments because it takes time to prepare 3D scan data (> 1 hour), to construct 3D solid model with a number of ventilation holes and assembly features (> 1 day), and to fabricate cast parts using additive manufacturing (> 2 days). To overcome such a limitation, this study proposes a new design concept for porous casts with the following features: The porous cast shells are prepared as standard sizes (i.e. small, medium, and large); one can choose a cast that is a little larger than his/her size; a number of flexible pins with variable lengths are fabricated using additive manufacturing and are inserted in holes of the porous cast so that the cast can be fully supported on a human body. Considering that a flexible pin can be manufactured within 5 minutes using a commercial 3D printer, the proposed cast can be prepared within an hour and be applicable to orthopedic treatments thereby.

Speaker
Biography:

Haeseong Jee has completed his PhD at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA and Post-doctoral studies from National Institute of Standards and Technology in USA. He is a Professor in Department of Mechanical and System Design Eng. at Hong Ik University, Seoul, Korea. He has published more than 40 journal papers in reputed journals and has servered as a Chief Vice President of Korea Society of Mechanical Engineering. His major research interests include CAD, GD&T, and design rules for additive manufacturing.

Abstract:

Directed energy deposition (DED), an ASTM (American Society for Testing and Material) process classification of metal 3D printing or additive manufacturing (AM) process has enabled to build full density metallic tools and parts using metal powders precisely delivered and controlled for deposition with no powder bed. Recently, DED processes, equipped with more than 3-axis tool mechanism and no additional machining process, turned out to be able to deposit overhang/undercut features directly on a part in multiple directions. Two additional axes of rotating and tilting added to the working table where the part is located need to be controlled using an advanced process management skill that can control multi-axis tool paths along the part. As the previous approach for a simple multi-axis slicing algorithm can only provide a stepwise motion control separately for each of the tool and the part, an integrated 5-axis motion control is needed for the continuous interaction between the tool and the part. A critical barrier to the approach is possible interference between the tool and the part. This study first provides a diagnose algorithm detecting singular part features requiring multi-axis motion control during the build. Second, build tool paths on each 3D build layer after the new slicing method avoiding any possible interference between the tool and the part is generated with a subsidiary visual simulation. The method has been implemented on two example STL models to be build using a DED process.

Speaker
Biography:

Lincy Pyl is a Professor at Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Her research expertise is related to structural design and analysis; numerical modeling; metal and composite structures; structural behavior under exceptional loading conditions; mechanical characterization and behaviour of lightweight/3D printed materials under fatigue, under high speed load conditions like blast, impact and crush.

Abstract:

Metal additive manufacturing technologies opened the door to the production of near-net shape products, lightweight structures and allow complex shapes to be manufactured. This innovation in combination with the need for assessment of the structural integrity, also in hard to access areas of engineering structures, has led to the development of an effective Structural Health Monitoring (eSHM) system. The system is based on a network of capillaries integrated in metallic structures to detect and monitor cracks by direct measurement of pressure changes. As these parts, like for example aircraft components in operational conditions, are cyclically loaded, their fatigue life is studied. The specimens with capillary are produced using two AM techniques: The metal-based powder bed fusion, Selective Laser Melting (SLM), and the direct Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) technologies. The existing literature clearly illustrates that the layer-wise manner of building, the rapid solidification and the high cooling rates inherent in AM processes most probably lead to residual stresses, roughness and porosities in the AM components which are negatively influencing the mechanical behavior and fatigue life. Therefore, four-point bending fatigue tests on AM and conventional specimens were conducted with special attention to crack nucleation, crack propagation, residual stresses and robustness of the eSHM system. The crack detection capability of the novel eSHM concept on a metallic structure has been demonstrated by means of various Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods.

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaoyong Tian has completed his PhD at Clausthal University of Technology, Germany from 2007-2010. He is an Associate Professor at School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of Progress in Additive Manufacturing.

Abstract:

Low-cost and high-efficiency manufacturing technologies for composite components are very important to further industrial applications. A novel 3D printing based fabrication method for continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTPCs) was put forward to overcome limitations of conventional forming process in expense and efficiency. Continuous fiber and thermoplastic filament were utilized as reinforcing phase and matrix, respectively, and simultaneously fed into the fused deposition modeling (FDM) process realizing the integrated preparation and forming of CFRTPCs without molds. Continuous carbon fiber reinforced poly lactic (CF/PLA) are used to print specimens to systematically study the influence of process parameters to mechanical properties and interfaces performance. The performance of parts changed regularly with variable process parameters, such as temperature of liquefier, layer thickness, hatch spacing, and feed rate of filament. Measurements of flexural strength and microstructures were conducted to establish the correlation of process parameters, microstructures, and mechanical performance. The forming mechanism of multiply interfaces in the 3D printed composites was proposed and utilized to explain the correlations between process and performance. Maximum flexural strength and modulus for CF/PLA specimens can reach to 335MPa and 30GPa, respectively, with optimized process parameters. Also, the fiber content can be easily controlled by changing the process parameters and maximum values of 27% were achieved. Composite components were fabricated to demonstrate the process feasibility in the rapid fabrication of light and complex composite structures. Potential applications in the field of aviation and aerospace could be found in the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Graduated 1983 Hadssah dental school The Hebrew University Jerusalem. Certified Cerec  /InLab Trainer by the ISCD and Sirona. Reviewer in several professional journals, ITI fellow, Director of the Israeli ITI Study Club. Published several studies in various fields of dentistry and currently teaching and training of Cad/Cam dentistry to Cerec and InLab users.

Abstract:

3D imaging by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), in combination with computer assisted navigation, is an ideal way to achieve predictable and successful implant and reconstructive dentistry. It is not the future of but the actual present of daily routine in reconstructive dental clinics. In this presentation I am going to describe a computerized work flow depicting the combination of intra oral scanning, CBCT, and 3D printing of the surgical template with actual clinical cases.

Katarzyna Kowalska

Wroclaw Medical University, Poland

Title: Mandibular reconstrucions using 3D technologies
Speaker
Biography:

Katarzyna Kowalska is a fourth-year medical student from Wroclaw Medical University and a member of Student  Scientific Society of Experimental Dentistry and Biomaterials Research.

Abstract:

Currenltly, 3D technology has indeed a significant impact on mandibular reconstrucions, especially after cancer surgeries like hemisection or mandibulectomy. In comparision with traditional reconstructive surgery, 3D techniques enable to restore function of stomatognathic system and rebuild face appearance in considrably more precise way because of individual adjustment of lost parts of patient’s mandible. Mandibular reconstruction is an extremely complex procedure due to complicated shape of the bone and despite the fact that the movements of mandible are correlated in both temporomandibular joints. The most popular 3D techniques of mandibular restoration are: reconstruction with titanum implants bent to mandibular margins and angle, hydroxyapatite-coated titanum implants, CAD/CAM polyamide implants and autograft from fibula. 3D computed tomography mandible models give an important opportunity of pre-operative planning the extensiveness of surgery and kinds of incisions as well. Thanks to CAD/CAM system, there is
a possibility of additional processing of mandible models that results in very appropriate face aesthetics.

Speaker
Biography:

Artem Sinelnik completed his Bachelor degree in Optical Techniques at Kharkiv National University of Radio Electronics. He is currently pursuing his Master’s degree in the field of Nanophotonics and Metamaterials at ITMO University in Russia. His research activity is focused on “Fabrication of nanostructures by the direct laser writing technique and studying the fabricated samples by means of optical diffraction”.

Abstract:

Metasurfaces are two-dimensional periodical structures that consist of nano- and micro-scale particles with the lattice spacing less than a wavelength of incident light. The fabrication of metasurfaces is novel area of materials science with many promising applications. Metasurfaces makes possible to tune the wavefront and phase of incident electromagnetic radiation according to arbitrary law. The aim of our work is to fabricate metasurfaces with graphene-type lattice (honey-comb structure) and to study it’s by means of optical methods. We fabricate over 300 samples with different parameters by exploiting two-photon polymerization direct laser writing technique. The side of the hexagonal comb is varied from 0.3 µm to 2 µm and the number of hexagons forming the structure is changed from a few to several hundreds. To control the quality of the synthesized samples, we use scanning electron microscopy. Also the fabricated structures are studied by optical methods. We investigate diffraction patterns of our structures in the visible range. An Nd-laser with 0.532 µm wavelength is used as light source. Although some samples have small sizes, the diffraction patterns on a 40 by 40 cm screen are bright and can be clearly analyzed by a naked eye. We investigate an evolution of the diffraction patterns of structure being transformed from metasurfaces to photonic crystal regime. This transition can be detected by appearance of the Laue diffraction.

Gean V Salmoria

Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil

Title: 3D printing of drug delivery systems by laser sintering
Speaker
Biography:

Gean V Salmoria completed his Graduation in Chemistry; MSc at Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) in Brazil and; PhD in Microwave Processing at Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse in France. He is a Specialist in Electro-thermal processes and Organic Material Chemistry. His research interest includes “Fabrication using microwave, ultra-violet and infra-red lasers, additive manufacturing and rapid tooling for extrusion and injection molding applied to automobile, aerospace and biomedical industries”. He is a Professor on Design with Plastics in Mechanical Engineering department of UFSC since 2001. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Research.

Abstract:

The increase in the number of people affected by genetic and infectious diseases resistant to conventional treatments has led to the need to develop new medical treatments by understanding the mechanisms of action and the targets of pharmacological action at the molecular level. As well as, to develop more specific transport systems for existing hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs in order to increase the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. Implantable drug delivery devices (DDDs) technology offer several advantages over conventional methods such as oral or parenteral dosage form, allowing specific drug administration at the target site, minimizing potential side effects. This therapy may provide controlled release of a medicine for acute and chronic treatments. In recent years, Additive Manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) processes such as Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) has shown great prominence in the biomedical field, and several researchers have conducted studies showing a wide diversity of materials and applications, such as the additive manufacturing of medical products, scaffolds and drug delivery devices (DDDs). SLS is a good alternative to controlling the porosity of bio-inert and bio-absorbable polymeric matrices and, consequently, control the drug release of implantable DDDs. In this study, DDDs with polymeric matrices, hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs were manufactured and characterized. The structure and properties of the manufactured DDDs were evaluated and correlated with the processing conditions.

Sushant Negi

National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, India

Title: Innovations in 3-D printing: A review
Speaker
Biography:

Sushant Negi has completed his PhD at National Institute of Technology Hamirpur, India. His research focused on “Improving the quality of selective laser sintered parts”. Presently, he is working as a Lecturer in Department of Mechanical Engineering at National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur. He has two years of teaching experience at under-graduate and post-graduate level. He has published nine papers in reputed journals and has attended several international conferences, seminars and presented papers.

Abstract:

The 3-dimensional (3D) printing is a revolutionary emerging technology by which products are fabricated directly from digital data in a similar way the computer text is printed on a paper, capturing the public’s imagination with its potential to offer flexible manufacturing for widespread use. With new processes and new materials, it offers infinite possibilities of customization which opens up the door for its application in several sectors such as engineering design, manufacturing, medicine, construction, and, of course, hobbying. In this article, we provide a brief history of the 3D printing technology and the key innovations in recent years.

Speaker
Biography:

Nneile Nkholise is pursuing her Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering at Central University of Technology. She currently holds an Under-graduate Degree at the same university. She is the Director of iMed Tech, a company that designs and manufactures medical prosthesis particularly segmented at the breast prosthesis. She has been recognized as World Economic Forum top female Innovator in Africa for her role in using additive manufacturing in prosthesis fabrication.

Abstract:

External maxillofacial prostheses are presently fabricated through traditional manufacturing techniques in South Africa. The limited number of technologists with the necessary skill as well as the lengthy time it takes to produce a single prosthesis results in a significant backlog in the provision of these prostheses at especially state run hospitals. Although additive manufacturing (AM) has been used before as secondary process to manufacture these prostheses, no proper study has been done to determine which AM process is best suited to this application. An improved process chain to manufacture external maxillofacial prostheses can be developed using AM. These prostheses can be manufactured at reduced time and without the necessary skill required to first sculpt a pattern in wax. An investigation into determining which AM process is best suited to manufacture external maxillofacial prostheses will lead to more accurate and cost effective prosthetics.

Biography:

Student of Mechatronics at SZABIST, Karachi, Pakistan

 

Abstract:

Since long time ago manufacturing was done by skilled persons with the help of an assistant, then slowly and gradually it transformed to more efficient manners like sand casting etc. With passage of time, number of people grew and so their needs, resulting in more demands, and to cater these demands, more supply is needed, in efficient and accurate manner. To accomplish this demand, in modern era, where everything needs to be efficient and, more or less, 100% accuracy is the key, with vast range of materials and designs. 3-D printing is a significant phenomenon to cater all these demands and supplies. Since its invention from 1980s, 3-D printing has gone through many phases, and day by day more efficient and productive work is being done in this industry. 3D printing grew enormously in last few years and is being used round the world. This paper will portray a clear analysis and some possibilities about different 3D printing phenomenon that are useful to cater modern era needs and wants.

Speaker
Biography:

Micheal Alabi completed his Bachelor of Engineering degree in Computer Science at Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria in 2010. In 2015, he completed his Master of Engineering degree at North West University, Republic of South Africa. He is currently a first year PhD student and working on “Additive manufacturing and 3D printing research” for his PhD thesis. He has great passion for research and would like to take more advanced research in additive manufacturing, cold spray technology, information technology and systems in his future career as a Researcher. He has worked for three years as an IT Technical Support Engineer at Interra Network Ltd, Abuja, Nigeria.

Abstract:

Additive manufacturing (AM) is the official industry standard term (ASTM F2792) for all applications of the technology which is also known as 3D printing technology. It is defined as the process of joining materials to make objects from 3D model data, and it is usually layer upon layer, as opposed to subtractive manufacturing methodologies. This technology has gained significant interest within the academic, research institute and industry because of its ability to create complex geometries with customizable material properties. Despite the late adoption of the technology, additive manufacturing has been active in South Africa for past 21 years and it is predicted that additive manufacturing technology will play a significant and game-changing role in the fourth industrial revolution and in particular it promises to play an ever growing role in efforts to re-industrialize the economy of South Africa. At the end of 2006, there were approximately 90 3D printers in South Africa and in 2015, it was estimated that there were 3500 additive manufacturing systems and 3D printers in circulation in South Africa. A reasonable number of these additive manufacturing machines are in the high end of the market, in science councils and higher education institutions and this shows that the future of additive manufacturing in South Africa is very bright compared to other African countries. This paper reviews the past and current industrial applications of additive manufacturing in South Africa from the academic research and industry perspective and what are the benefits of this technology to manufacturing companies and industrial sectors in the country.